Part Eight. Dissonances of the Mind

Part Eight

Dissonances of the Mind

Psychopathology as Disturbance of the Brain Technology

Abstract

There is an imbalance in the cognitive sciences: either there are concepts at the level of general psychology without reference to the reality of internal processes in the brain or a deepening into the details of physiology without a systemic concept. In the absence of a grounded theoretical model of the Mind, the practical treatment of its disorders becomes “wandering in the dark.” How can you fix something if there is no understanding of what it is physically and how it works?

Psychotherapy and psychiatry remain the only branches of medicine in which diagnostics has nothing to do with assessing the state of the organ that performs the mental functions under consideration. All diagnoses in this area are just a description of a set of symptoms — syndromes. As a result, all systemic pathologies are currently incurable.

Is there a way out of the impasse? The path that other branches of medicine have followed for a long time points us to it: a strictly physical, physiological and technological approach. When studying any organ or system, questions arise: what does this substrate do, what does it represent as a physical system, what is the physiology and technology of its functioning. To treat pathologies, we need to understand how the system works normally. Diagnostics is not limited to the description of symptoms but sets itself to answer the following questions: what function is impaired, what is the physical disturbance of the technology. This approach has created a breakthrough in the treatment of many previously incurable diseases. It can also lead us to a breakthrough in the treatment of pathologies of the Mind.

In the eighth part of the study, the author describes the mechanism’s failures leading to the disintegration of the consciousness process and begins to create a new approach to the analysis, diagnosis, and classification of pathologies based on the proposed concept. In particular, he offers a radically new view of such systemic pathologies as autism and schizophrenia.

It may be the beginning of the transition from the symptomatic, syndromic approach in modern psychotherapy and psychiatry to the real diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the Soul as disorders in the brain.

 

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